What is a Tflop ?

A teraflop or tflop system is a parallel supercomputing structure that is capable of calculating one trillion floating-point operations in a single second. This term applies in numerous ways to the essential systems that run database systems.

The tflop system is not the original parallel supercomputing system created, although it has turned into the one mostly used. The Intel Paragon was already in reality and a parallel processing system like tflop. Both systems are reliable options, but the tflop system is not as complicated to use as the Intel Paragon system. The N-cube system came before the Intel Paragon, but this is an outdated system and hardly ever used.

Based on the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), the two systems created before the tflop worked just fine for their time. The AAAI says that the N-cube and the Paragon were two of the many milestones on the lane towards the hugely parallel, todays distributed memory systems. Since the tflop is an analogous processing system, a huge problem can be narrowed down into smaller, more controllable problems with this system.

With the teraflop system, the user is capable of spreading the work instead of processing it all in a single chip. This creates a faster processing. Increased speed is achievable because the teraflop system is a distributed memory system. Once the memory is distributed, every part of the system has its own memory. This enables each point of the entire project to get individualized attention. If a certain aspect of the project running with the tflop system is too big, the major component controlling that specific part can ask for extra memory.

Cougar is the name the software running in the teraflop system. It is designed to trim down the work a program does, making more space of the hardware accessible to the computer user. Teraflop has revolutionized the computer production in relation to databases because, with teraflop in place, databases can run much faster.

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